Australia vs England

Australia vs England: Australia vs Englandin the ICC Cricket World Cup 2019 Not since the 1987 final has Australia vs England in a men’s World Cup knockout fixture, but on Thursday night at Edgbaston, they will again Australia vs England . “It’s a moment in your life that may not be repeated Our Match Prediction The second semi-final of the ICC World Cup 2019 is going to be played between England and Australia vs Edgbaston, Birmingham on the 11th of July. Matthew Wade, Mitchell Marsh, Peter Handscomb have joined the squad for the remained of Australia’s World Cup

Former captain Michael Vaughan has backed England to win the World Cup ahead of their semi-final showdown with Australia. The Ashes rivals meet in Birmingham on Thursday with England aiming to keep their hopes of winning a first-ever World Cup alive and Australia going for a sixth title.

Australia are the most successful team in the history of the competition and have won their past four World Cup meetings with England, but Vaughan still expects Eoin Morgan’s side to progress to the final. If England beat Australia, they will face either India or New Zealand at Lord’s in Sunday’s final. Eoin Morgan’s side face Australia in the second semi-final (Picture: Getty) Asked who he believes will win the World Cup,

Vaughan told the Test Match Special podcast: ‘England, I think. But India will be very tough to beat in the final.’ England, who finished third in the group stage after winning six of their nine matches, looked set to face India in the semi-final but Australia slipped up in their final match to drop to second. ‘They won’t admit

it, but England will be quietly quite happy to play Australia,’ 2005 Ashes-winning captain Vaughan said. ‘It’s going to be a difficult game but if you had to pick one of the two you would pick Australia at Edgbaston, knowing you won’t have to play them at Lord’s.’ Morgan’s side suffered a comprehensive defeat to Australia at Lord’s last month but boast a superb record in Birmingham, winning their last four ODIs at the venue.

The Aussies thrashed England at Lord’s last month (Picture: Getty) They also knocked Australia out of the Champions Trophy with a 40-run victory at Edgbaston two years ago. Vaughan added: ‘Edgbaston and Trent Bridge are two of the grounds where you arrive feeling very, very comfortable as an England player, so England will be delighted to play there. ‘The fact England have won two must-win games on the trot must stand them in good stead that they can cope with that pressure. ‘But they also know Australia gave them a good hiding a few weeks ago. I just look at left-arm seam bowlers and I look at Lord’s in particular.

‘Australia have two left-arm quicks. Because of the slope it can be a real advantage to have left-armers, so they are playing at a ground where I don’t think it plays a bigger part.’ England are bidding to win the World Cup for the first time in history (Picture: Getty) England face Australia in their first semi-final appearance since 1992.

The team have not won a World Cup knockout match in 27 years. But Vaughan believes the hosts are the ‘favourites’ to lift the trophy and says anything but ultimate victory will be considered a ‘failure’. ‘England over the course of the past four years have managed to beat everyone in all conditions and now it’s time to show they can do it under the upmost pressure,’ he said. ‘Failure for England for me is not winning. They are such a good team. They are favourites, they have to go on and win it.’

England, Australia, India and New Zealand will battle it out to be crowned champions after progressing to the semi-finals of the ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup.

A five-week, 45-match group stage drew to a close this weekend, leaving just four teams still in with a chance of lifting the World Cup trophy at Lord’s come July 14. And it was the four best sides – according to the rankings, at least – who qualified for the knockout stages, with group leaders India facing New Zealand in the first semi-final on Tuesday.

Two days later, host nation England – bidding to win the ICC Men’s World Cup for the first time – will attempt to reach the final by knocking out defending champions Australia. India v New Zealand (Emirates Old Trafford, Tuesday, 10.30am) Virat Kohli has led India to the World Cup semi-finals (Picture: Getty) What happened in the group stage? For India, the group stage was a relatively straightforward affair. After having to wait almost a week to kick-start their campaign, Virat Kohli’s side won their opening two games before their encounter with New Zealand was abandoned. An emphatic and joyful victory over rivals Pakistan followed, before the two-time winners secured maximum points from their games against Afghanistan and West Indies, despite being pushed all the way by the former.

Defeat to England mattered little to India, who recovered to beat Bangladesh and Sri Lanka and finish top of the group stage. Considering their consistent performances over the month, it was nothing more than they deserved. New Zealand need to regroup after three consecutive defeats (Picture: Getty) New Zealand enjoyed an equally strong start, securing three straight wins before the India wash-out.

Narrow triumphs over South Africa and West Indies followed, before Kane Williamson’s side tasted defeat for the first time in the competition at the hands of Pakistan. That loss would mark the start of a tricky period for the Kiwis, who were subsequently beaten by Australia and England to ensure they enter the semi-finals on the back of three successive defeats.

ENG vs AUS

ENG vs AUS Live:Australia at Edgbaston with a World Cup final in prospect. It is time to salivate or fret or rejoice depending on your disposition. Despite all the ancient history England are favourites. Australia have played seven World Cup semi-finals and have not lost any; they have lifted the trophy five times.No wonder they always seem pretty relaxed about the process though Aaron Finch surprised a few when he said he was planning to spend Wednesday afternoon watching The Queen’s Corgi.

And today it’s renewed once more, as England take on Australia for a place in the final of the Cricket World Cup.

The fans will be fired up – as will the players – as they take on an old enemy.

So why is there such a long-running beef between these two teams in particular?

To answer that question, you need to travel back almost 150 years.

Because although today’s match will be a one-day game, the intense rivalry has its roots in the history of Test cricket between the two sides.

And it all started with a tiny pottery perfume jar.

Ashes to Ashes
Cricket has its roots in 16th Century England, but the first international matches were played in the late 1800s.

An England team played in Australia in 1877, in what are regarded as some of the first ever international Test matches, and a return series was held five years later.

It was after those games in 1882 that a sporting newspaper made a joke that became part of history.

The Sporting Times ran a fake “obituary for English cricket” that concluded “the body will be cremated and the ashes taken to Australia”.

So when England set off for their next games against Australia, captain Ivo Bligh was able to say he was aiming to win back “the Ashes”.

And that’s why the name is used every time England and Australia contest a Test series.

Image caption
It’s only 11cm tall but for many cricketers it’s the biggest prize in sport
The famous urn, which is now on display at Lord’s Cricket Ground, was presented to Ivo Bligh in Melbourne. It’s claimed it contains the burned remains of a cricket bail – though we are at the point where sporting fact blurs with sporting legend.

The urn is far too delicate to be used as an actual trophy – a crystal replica is now presented to the winning team.

Image copyrightGETTY IMAGES
Image caption
Seventy Ashes series have been played – Australia have won 33, England 32
What is certain is that the Ashes is one of the most famous and longest-lived international rivalries in sport.

It’s a battle that will be fought again this summer shortly after the World Cup has finished.

Bodyline bowlers and swearing sledgers
The beef has become ever more heated as the years have gone by.

Any cricket fan will tell you that the “Bodyline” series is one of the most controversial ever played.

In the early 1930s, England captain Douglas Jardine instructed his bowlers to aim directly at the Australian batsmen, including the legendary Don Bradman.

Image copyrightPA MEDIA
Image caption
The Don: many fans still regard Bradman as the GOAT
There was an outcry – and the laws of the game were changed as a result.

But some of the verbal tactics employed by both sides have been equally devastating at times.

“Sledging” – what most of us would call good old-fashioned heckling – has become an integral part of any game between these two teams.

Some of the most memorable can’t be repeated here – but bowler Merv Hughes once claimed sledging was responsible for a quarter of the wickets he ever took.

Hughes once asked England’s Graham Gooch: “Would you like me to bowl a piano and see if you can play that?”

Cricketing Twitter
The age of social media has given the world a whole new place to insult each other, even when the cricket’s not on.

Cyber-sledging, you might call it, if that didn’t sound too much like a bad virtual reality game.

Take, for instance, this aggressive delivery from Michael Vaughan when both Australia’s men and women lost on the same day in 2018.The hosts lost to Australia in the group stage, but reached their first semi since 1992 with wins against India and New Zealand.

“The last two games we managed to produce something near our best performances,” Morgan told BBC Sport.

“That’s extremely encouraging.”

England began the World Cup as favourites and the number-one ranked team, but were on the verge of going out after being beaten by Australia at Lord’s.

To make it to the last four, they had to defeat both India and New Zealand, the two sides that contested the other semi-final.

“We’re delighted to be here,” added Morgan, whose side are bidding to face New Zealand in Sunday’s final at Lord’s.

“Throughout the group stage, it looked in question, but I don’t think we could be better prepared. We’re extremely excited and looking forward to it.

“Looking back, it hasn’t worked out badly at all.”

AUS vs ENG

AUS vs ENG Live:It’s an Ashes showdown in the second semi-final as Australia and tournament host England vie for a spot against New Zealand in the Cricket, Captain Eoin Morgan believes his England side could not be better prepared for their World Cup semi-final against Australia at Edgbaston on Thursday. The hosts lost to Australia in the group stage, but reached their first semi since 1992 with wins against India and New Zealand.It’s one of the oldest and most enduring rivalries in sport. And today it’s renewed once more, as England take on Australia for a place in the final

And today it’s renewed once more, as England take on Australia for a place in the final of the Cricket World Cup.

The fans will be fired up – as will the players – as they take on an old enemy.

So why is there such a long-running beef between these two teams in particular?

To answer that question, you need to travel back almost 150 years.

Because although today’s match will be a one-day game, the intense rivalry has its roots in the history of Test cricket between the two sides.

And it all started with a tiny pottery perfume jar.

Ashes to Ashes
Cricket has its roots in 16th Century England, but the first international matches were played in the late 1800s.

An England team played in Australia in 1877, in what are regarded as some of the first ever international Test matches, and a return series was held five years later.

It was after those games in 1882 that a sporting newspaper made a joke that became part of history.

The Sporting Times ran a fake “obituary for English cricket” that concluded “the body will be cremated and the ashes taken to Australia”.

So when England set off for their next games against Australia, captain Ivo Bligh was able to say he was aiming to win back “the Ashes”.

And that’s why the name is used every time England and Australia contest a Test series.

Image caption
It’s only 11cm tall but for many cricketers it’s the biggest prize in sport
The famous urn, which is now on display at Lord’s Cricket Ground, was presented to Ivo Bligh in Melbourne. It’s claimed it contains the burned remains of a cricket bail – though we are at the point where sporting fact blurs with sporting legend.

The urn is far too delicate to be used as an actual trophy – a crystal replica is now presented to the winning team.

Image copyrightGETTY IMAGES
Image caption
Seventy Ashes series have been played – Australia have won 33, England 32
What is certain is that the Ashes is one of the most famous and longest-lived international rivalries in sport.

It’s a battle that will be fought again this summer shortly after the World Cup has finished.

Bodyline bowlers and swearing sledgers
The beef has become ever more heated as the years have gone by.

Any cricket fan will tell you that the “Bodyline” series is one of the most controversial ever played.

In the early 1930s, England captain Douglas Jardine instructed his bowlers to aim directly at the Australian batsmen, including the legendary Don Bradman.

Image copyrightPA MEDIA
Image caption
The Don: many fans still regard Bradman as the GOAT
There was an outcry – and the laws of the game were changed as a result.

But some of the verbal tactics employed by both sides have been equally devastating at times.

“Sledging” – what most of us would call good old-fashioned heckling – has become an integral part of any game between these two teams.

Some of the most memorable can’t be repeated here – but bowler Merv Hughes once claimed sledging was responsible for a quarter of the wickets he ever took.

Hughes once asked England’s Graham Gooch: “Would you like me to bowl a piano and see if you can play that?”

Cricketing Twitter
The age of social media has given the world a whole new place to insult each other, even when the cricket’s not on.

Cyber-sledging, you might call it, if that didn’t sound too much like a bad virtual reality game.

Take, for instance, this aggressive delivery from Michael Vaughan when both Australia’s men and women lost on the same day in 2018.The hosts lost to Australia in the group stage, but reached their first semi since 1992 with wins against India and New Zealand.

“The last two games we managed to produce something near our best performances,” Morgan told BBC Sport.

“That’s extremely encouraging.”

England began the World Cup as favourites and the number-one ranked team, but were on the verge of going out after being beaten by Australia at Lord’s.

To make it to the last four, they had to defeat both India and New Zealand, the two sides that contested the other semi-final.

“We’re delighted to be here,” added Morgan, whose side are bidding to face New Zealand in Sunday’s final at Lord’s.

“Throughout the group stage, it looked in question, but I don’t think we could be better prepared. We’re extremely excited and looking forward to it.

“Looking back, it hasn’t worked out badly at all.”